The British Musical Miscellany (Various)

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Fynnjamin (2020/7/7)

5 more: Volume 2 • Volume 3 • Volume 4 • Volume 5 • Volume 6

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Fynnjamin (2020/7/7)

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Fynnjamin (2020/7/7)

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Fynnjamin (2020/7/7)

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Fynnjamin (2020/7/7)

PDF scanned by GB-En
Fynnjamin (2020/7/7)

Publisher. Info. London: John Walsh, No.514, 525, 542, 571, 579, 626, n.d.[1733-1734].
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Fynnjamin (2020/7/7)

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Fynnjamin (2020/7/7)

Publisher. Info. London: John Walsh, No.525, 579, n.d.[1733-1734].
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General Information

Work Title The British Musical Miscellany
Alternative. Title The British Musical Miscellany, or, the Delightful Grove: Being a Collection of Celebrated English, and Scotch Songs, By the best Masters. Set for the Violin, German Flute, the Common Flute, and Harpsichord.
Composer Various
I-Catalogue NumberI-Cat. No. None [force assignment]
Movements/SectionsMov'ts/Sec's 6 volumes:
  • Volume 1
  1. Arne: Was ever nymph like Rosamond from Rosamond
  2. Mr. Gouge: The Ladies' Case
  3. Anonymous: The last time I came o'er the Moor
  4. Anonymous: The Solitary Lover
  5. Greene: Charming Sylvia
  6. Folk Songs: And this is no mine ain House
  7. Anonymous: The Modest Concealment
  8. Anonymous: The Amorous Protector
  9. Greene: The Fly
  10. Anonymous: The Complaint
  11. H.D.: Beauty and Love at variance grown
  12. W. Powells: The Lover's Plea
  13. Mr. Vincent: On Chloris's Unkindness
  14. Festing: The Doubtful Shepherd
  15. Greene: True Love
  16. Anonymous: The Ravish'd Lover
  17. Galliard: As the Moles silent stream
  18. Lampe: Amelia wishes when she dies from Amelia (1732)
  19. Mr. Scrimshaw: The Bashful Lover
  20. Anonymous: The Vicar of Bray
  21. Sheeles: An Apology for Loving a Widow
  22. Holcombe: The Happy Man
  23. Greene: While blooming youth and gay Delight
  24. Anonymous: The Maid's Request
  25. Anonymous: Bacchus Defeated
  26. Anonymous: The Sublime Passion
  27. Anonymous: The Unhappy Swain
  28. Anonymous: Celia in a Jessamine Bower
  29. Greene: Ye happy swains whose Hearts are free
  30. Anonymous: The Farmer's Son
  31. Folk Songs: The Lass of Livingstone
  32. Leveridge: If Love be a Fault
  33. James V of Scotland (attributed): The Gaberlunzie Man
  34. Charke: Venus now leaves her Paphian Dwelling from Impromptu Revel Masque
  35. Charke: Ah, how inviting, ah, how delighting from Impromptu Revel Masque
  36. Charke: Sweet Linnets, on every Spray from Impromptu Revel Masque
  37. William Barton (also attributed to Babell): Mariana's Charms wound my Heart
  38. Anonymous: The Too Curious Swain
  39. Pepusch: Thirsis, a young and am'rous Swain
  40. Leveridge: Love's Reward
  41. Geminiani: A Burlesque to Geminiani's Minuet
  42. Anonymous: Melinda's Complaint
  43. Mr. Scrimshaw: When I first saw thee gracefull move
  44. Thomas Bowman: The Replication
  45. Morgan (or George Morgan): By shady Woods and purling streams
  46. Arne: Beneath some hoary Mountain from Rosamond
  47. Anonymous: The Happy Swain
  48. Anonymous: O'er the Moor to Maggie
  49. Anonymous: The Unskillful Lover (A Dialogue)
  50. Leveridge: Cupid, my Pleasure/Bacchus, my Treasure
  51. Leveridge: Vain Man to think of Joy on Earth
  52. Edward Phillips (presumably): Come, be free, my lovely Lasses from The Livery Rake
  53. Edward Phillips (presumably): Don't you teize me, let me go from The Livery Rake
  54. Anonymous: Since Love is my Foe from The Lover's Opera
  55. Greene: Celadon's Jugg
  56. Anonymous: Advice to the Ladies
  57. Anonymous: The Blind Boy
  58. Folk Songs: Dumbarton's Drums
  59. Carey: Leave leave your folded Flocks in Peace to sleep (A Pastoral)
  60. "An Eminent Master": Shepherdesses pretty Lasses (A Pastoral)
  61. Anonymous: Cupid and Charlotte
  62. Anonymous: The Jolly Bacchanal
  63. Anonymous: When Parents Obstinate and cruel from The Scotch Humour
  64. Anonymous: The London Lass
  65. Anonymous: The Coy Lass
  66. Carey: The Prince of Orange's Welcome
  67. Burgess Sr. or Burgess Jr.: Damon and Cloe
  68. Anonymous: Peggy's Mill
  69. Leveridge: On a Watch hanging at a Bed's Head
  70. Arne: Charmer of my Soul away from Dido and Aeneas (1734)
  71. Boyce: What tho' you cannot move her
  72. Anonymous: The Lofty Beggars
  73. Anonymous: The Illusion
  74. Leveridge: The Critical Minute
  75. Anonymous: The Unwilling Departure
  76. Anonymous: The Farewell
  77. Anonymous: Advice to the Unwary
  78. Anonymous: Happy Myrtillo
  79. Whichello: The Divine Right of Beauty
  80. Anonymous: The Young Lover's First Address
  81. Morgan (or George Morgan): Great Love thou universal King
  82. Anonymous: Damon and Cloe
  83. Leveridge: Charming Myra
  84. Boyce: The Hopeless Swain
  85. Arne: Soft Desires, glowing fires from Dido and Aeneas (1734)
  86. Anonymous: The Lady's Complaint for the Departure of her Lover
  87. Leveridge: Joy to our Sovereign, George, the King
  88. Lampe: Whilst endless Tears and Sighs declare from Fatal Falshood
  89. Anonymous: Tweed-side
  90. William Wheeler: Tell me, my Charmer, prithee do
  91. Anonymous: The Despairing Lover
  92. Carey: The Nightingale
  93. Anonymous: The Amorous Lover
  94. Anonymous: Advice to Youth
  95. Anonymous: The Coy Lady
  96. Anonymous: Oh! what Pleasure will abound from The Lottery (1732)
  97. Flackton: Clarinda
  98. Carey: A Hunting Song (The Hounds are all out and the Morning does peep)

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  • Volume 2
  1. Carey: Generous Love
  2. Anonymous: Nector chang'd by the Gods into Punch
  3. Anonymous: Phillis, the Toast
  4. Leveridge: Cloe my breast did fire
  5. Leveridge: Small is the Spot of Earth
  6. Handel: Phillis be kind and hear my love from English Songs
  7. Carey: Once for all
  8. Anonymous: Love and Philosophie
  9. Folk Songs: Nanny O
  10. Sheeles: A Sigh
  11. Anonymous: The Shepherds Complaint
  12. Mr. Webber: On a Lady throwing Snow Balls
  13. Anonymous: The Apology
  14. Mr. Gouge: Hopeless Love
  15. Anonymous: A Minuet (As on a sunshine summer's Day)
  16. Anonymous: The Lover's Request
  17. Leveridge: Damon ask'd me but once
  18. Lampe: Ah Traitress, wicked, and impure from Amelia (1732)
  19. Leveridge: Sure ne'er was a Dog so wretched as I
  20. Anonymous: Mary Scot
  21. Anonymous: Marian's Complaint
  22. Leveridge: When Jealous Cupid first survey'd
  23. Leveridge: A Dialogue between Death and a Dying Person
  24. Carey: Love and Prudence
  25. Carey: The Resolve
  26. Anonymous: The Slighted Lover
  27. Anonymous: Advice to Clarinda
  28. Pepusch: Beauty and Musick
  29. Anonymous: The Jolly Topers
  30. Anonymous: An Epithalamium
  31. Mr. Gouge: Phebe
  32. Anonymous: Trust not Man, for he'll deceive you from Ariadne (possibly Arianna in Creta)
  33. Anonymous: Linco's Advice to Damon
  34. Smith: When fair Ophelia tunes her Voice
  35. Handel: Love ever vanquishing, Hearts softly languishing from Acis and Galatea
  36. Leveridge: Good Nature Preferable to Wit or Beauty
  37. Mr. Gouge: Jockey and Jenny
  38. Anonymous: The Foolish Prude
  39. Anonymous: A Scotch Dialogue in Imitation of an Ode in Horace
  40. Mr. Hayward: From cens'ring the State, and what passes above
  41. Lampe: My charmer's very Name does all my Soul enflame from Amelia (1732)
  42. Folk Songs: The Queen of May (parody of Over the Hills and Far Away)
  43. Anonymous: Blink over the Burn, Sweet Betty
  44. Anonymous: Celia Sighing
  45. Carey: The Wheedler
  46. Anonymous: Truth (I have been in Love)
  47. Anonymous: To Salinda
  48. Anonymous: The Wish
  49. Handel: The Dream (Beneath a shady Willow)
  50. Leveridge: Thanks to the Parson
  51. Anonymous: The Country Life
  52. Mr. Gouge: False Philander
  53. Anonymous: The Fair Emelia
  54. Handel: I come my fairest treasure (English version of "Non è si vago e bello" from Giulio Cesare in Egitto)
  55. Anonymous: The Plain Dealer
  56. Leveridge: The Antidote or the Coquet's End
  57. Mr. S. H.: An Apology
  58. Folk Songs: The Birks of Endermay
  59. Boyce: Fair Silvia
  60. John Harris: Oft have I Swore I'd Love no more
  61. Handel: Return fair Maid to Fields and Farms (English version of a minuet aria from Poro, re dell'Indie)
  62. Leveridge: How servile is the state of Man
  63. Folk Songs/David Rizzio: Beneath a Beech's grateful Shade (parody of "The bonniest Lass in a' the World")
  64. Greene: Florimel
  65. John Hudson: As Granville's soft Numbers, tune Myra's praise
  66. Anonymous: The Silent Confession
  67. Festing: To Sallinda
  68. Handel: Love thou great ruler thee I adore
  69. John Harris: Since Celia's unkind, and my Passion disdains
  70. Anonymous: The True Philosophy
  71. Folk Songs: Love is the Cause of my Mourning
  72. Howard: While from our Looks, fair Nymph, you guess
  73. Boyce: The Distracted Lover
  74. Geminiani: Know, Madam I never was born (text set to a Minuet)
  75. Leveridge: Old Poets have told us, when they were grown mellow
  76. Folk Songs: There's my Thumb, I'll ne'er beguile thee
  77. Whichello: Contentment
  78. Anonymous: The Merry Baccanallian
  79. Handel: A Bacchanallian Song (Let's be merry and banish thinking)
  80. Handel: How is it possible, how can I forbear? (text set to the minuet from the overture of Arianna in Creta)
  81. Carey: In these Groves with Content and Tranquility
  82. Howard: The Force of Friendship
  83. Boyce: Castalio's Complaint
  84. Carey: A Song in Brittannia
  85. Anonymous: The Expectation
  86. Anonymous: On Mr. Duck's Preferment
  87. Holcombe: Charming Neæra
  88. Folk Songs: The Bush aboon Traquair
  89. Anonymous: Why can't You and I be free
  90. Lampe: The Youngling ravish'd from its Nest from Amelia (1732)
  91. John Harris: Let longing Lovers sit and pine
  92. Folk Songs: The Lass of Peaty's Mill
  93. Anonymous: The Coquet
  94. Dieupart: The Female Phaeton
  95. John Harris: A Life without Trouble
  96. Ariosti: The Passionate Lover (English text set to an air)
  97. Leveridge: A Hunting Song (The sweet Rosie morn peeps over the Hills)

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  • Volume 3
  1. Handel: Beauteous Nymph, far hence be gone (English version of "Secondaste al fine, oh stelle" from Il pastor fido)
  2. Folk Songs: Bonny Jean
  3. Anonymous: The Expostulation
  4. Handel: Myra, no more beguile (English version of "Dimmi, cara" from Publio Cornelio Scipione)
  5. Anonymous: A Lover's Excuse for his Inconstancy
  6. Anonymous: A Song on the Prince and Princess of Orange
  7. Carey: Crowds of coxcombs thus deluding
  8. Smith: When absent from the Nymph I love
  9. Lampe: Men born on Earth like other brutes from Timon in Love (1733)
  10. Anonymous: To Salinda
  11. Anonymous: Advice to Chloe
  12. Martin Smith: Ten Years, like Troy, my stubborn Heart
  13. Mr. Gladwin: When charming Cloe gently Walk's
  14. Folk Songs: Farewell to Lochaber
  15. Anonymous: A Civil Truth
  16. Lampe: I'll court the fair Idols no more to comply
  17. Lampe: From the Age of fifteen we Women 'tis true from Timon in Love (1733)
  18. Anonymous: Ye Gentle Gales that fan the Air
  19. Greene: On Princess Amelia (Ye Nymphs of Bath)
  20. Anonymous: The Diffident Lover
  21. Anonymous: Hymen in Chains
  22. Greene: Ah! Syren charmer, turn again
  23. Handel: Go, Cupid, flatt'ring Chit (English version of "Sì, caro, ti stringo al fin" from Admeto)
  24. Carey: Divinest Fair, oh ease my Care
  25. Anonymous: Apollo and Daphne
  26. Folk Songs: Sleepy Body
  27. Lampe: Farewell Amelia lovely Fair
  28. Folk Songs: The Wrangling Lovers
  29. Anonymous: The Happy Lover
  30. Folk Songs: The Spinning Lass
  31. Handel: The Slighted Swain from English Songs
  32. S. G.: The Lady's Dream
  33. Anonymous: Charming Cloe
  34. Anonymous: Who, to win a Woman's Favour from Columbine Courtesan (1739)
  35. Anonymous: The Determin'd Nymph
  36. Folk Songs: Hap me with thy Petticoat
  37. Carey: A Song in Brittannia (Noble stranger, I approve thee)
  38. Handel: Lovely Belinda, wonder of Nature (English version of "Sciolga dunque al balla, al canto" from Parnasso in festa)
  39. Bononcini: Observe yon tunefull Charmer (likely an English version of an aria from an opera)
  40. Mr. Seedo: Hampstead
  41. Smith: The Night was still, the Air serene
  42. Hayes: As Sappho cross'd the Dang'rous sea
  43. Lampe: The Premonition
  44. Folk Songs: The Peremptory Lover (parody of "John Anderson my Jo, John")
  45. Nares: Long from th'assaults of Cupids Arms
  46. Folk Songs: With broken words, and downcast eyes
  47. Richardson: Wanton gales that Fondly play round
  48. Travers: The Protestation
  49. Samuel Cooke: The Dream
  50. Bononcini: 'Tis my Glory to adore you (English version of "Per la gloria d'adorarvi" from Griselda)
  51. Geminiani: The Sympathizing Heart (likely English text set to a minuet)
  52. Handel: God of Musick, charm the Charmer (English version of an aria from Rodelinda, regina de' Longobardi)
  53. Folk Songs: The Bob of Dunblane
  54. Carey: The Happy Nuptials
  55. "A Gentleman:" The Beautiful Amanda
  56. Anonymous: Ye Gods! was Strephon's Picture blest
  57. Anonymous: Flora's Holliday
  58. Arne: In that dear hope how many live
  59. "A Scholar of Mr. Careys:" Strephon Request
  60. Smith: To fight in your Cups and a buse
  61. Mr. Sam's: Within a solitary Grove despairing
  62. Anonymous: The Agreement of the Gods
  63. Handel: Strephon's Complaint from English Songs
  64. Lampe: If Bounteous Nature e'er had meant
  65. Carey: Lovely ruler of my Heart
  66. Handel: A Dialogue (Men are all Traytors/Women are fickle)
  67. Anonymous: The Inconstant Swain
  68. Anonymous: A Drinking Song (Ev'ry Man his Scepter take)
  69. Mr. Sam's: No more shall Meads bedeck'd with flowers
  70. Ramsay: The Soldier's Welcome Home (Auld Lang Syne)
  71. Mr. Webber: Cloe's Advice to Strephon
  72. Pepusch: When severest woes Impending from Perseus and Andromeda (1717)
  73. Handel: Lamenting, complaining of Celia's disdaining (English version of "V'adoro, pupille" from Giulio Cesare in Egitto)
  74. Richardson: Thou rising sun whose gladsome ray
  75. Anonymous: The mournfull Shepherd
  76. Greene: The sun was sunk beneath the Hill
  77. Handel: The Beauteous Cloe (English version of an aria from Ottone, re di Germania)
  78. Anonymous: Through the Wood Laddie
  79. Bononcini: The Invocation (likely an English version of an aria from an opera)
  80. Mr. D.: Love is a pretty thing
  81. S. G.: Fly false Man deceiver go
  82. Bononcini: Dear Pritty Maid, don't fly me so (likely an English version of an aria from an opera)
  83. Leveridge: The Roast Beef of Old England
  84. "An Eminent Master:" Tho' Fate decrees that we must part
  85. Anonymous: A Drinking Song (Fill the Bowl with streams of Pleasure)
  86. Carey: A Dialogue (My Cares, my Dangers all are past)
  87. Folk Songs: Muirland Willie
  88. Lampe: The Amorous Protestation
  89. Greene: Henry and Katherine
  90. Handel: Come to my Arms my Treasure (English version of an aria from Ottone, re di Germania)
  91. "A Gentleman of Oxford:" To a Young Lady Weeping
  92. Carey: Oh Jealousy Thou raging Pain
  93. Lampe: The Faithfull Lovers' Farewell
  94. John Hams: Why Cloe will you Author be
  95. D. Fox: The Complaint
  96. Carey: Would you live a stale Virgin forever
  97. Anonymous: A Hymn to Venus
  98. Carey: A Hunting Song (Hark! away, 'tis the merry ton'd Horn)
First Publication. 1733-34
Librettist mostly unattributed; including:
Henry Carey
William Oldys
Joseph Addison
Thomas Bowman
Bazalele Morris
Mr Mitchell
George Sewell
Richard Leveridge
James V of Scotland (attributed)
Dr Parnell
Jonathan Swift
Mr Parratt
Colley Cibber
Mr Baker
Benjamin Griffin
words from the Weekly Miscellany
a Lady
John Hughes, esq.
William Bedingfield
Arthur Bradley
John Lockman
Captain C.
Mr Manly
Mr G. L.
Thomas Brerewood jun.
P. W., esq.
Mr Lamb
Mr Jersey
I. A., esq., a scholar of Mr Carey's
John Vanbrugh
William Congreve
F. R.
Mr Dilbury
John Gay
Aaron Hill, esq.
R. Courtivil, esq. (Raphael Courteville)
Mr Concanen
from The Spectator
Matthew Prior
James Moore, esq.
Language English
Piece Style Baroque
Instrumentation voice, continuo; optional flute, recorder, or violin; 2 voices, continuo; voice, violin, viola, continuo (Clarinda, by Flackton, Vol.1)  ; 2 voices; voice, 2 violins, continuo

Navigation etc.

A lengthy collection of English songs, airs, duets, and folk songs from the early 18th century. Many works are by unknown/anonymous composers, and some are from obscure stage works with little surviving information.

Points of Interest:

  • There are numerous Scottish and Irish folk songs, reflecting the "British" (as opposed to just "English") nature of the collection
  • There are also many English language versions of opera seria arias by Handel and Bononcini
  • Volume 3 contains Allan Ramsay's version of "Auld Lang Syne" and Leveridge's "The Roast Beef of Old England"
  • The first five volumes end with hunting songs, while the final volume ends with the Scottish folk song "For Our Lang Biding Here"

Composers unidentified or without IMSLP pages:

  • Mr Gouge
  • H. D.
  • W. Powells
  • Mr Vincent
  • Mr Scrimshaw
  • James V of Scotland (attributed)
  • William Barton (maybe author of words instead)
  • Mr Morgan (either Thomas Morgan or George Morgan)
  • "An Eminent Master"
  • William Wheeler, organist of Newbury
  • Mr Webber
  • Mr Hayward
  • Mr S. H.
  • John Harris
  • David Rizzio (sometimes used by James Oswald as a pseudonym)
  • John Hudson
  • Martin Smith
  • Mr Gladwin
  • S. G.
  • Mr Seedo
  • Samuel Cooke
  • Mr Sams
  • Mr D.
  • a Gentleman of Oxford
  • John Hams
  • D. Fox
  • Sigr Verdini
  • F. R.
  • William Hodson
  • Mr James
  • Mr Wilson
  • Mr Wilford
  • Mr Markwell
  • Mr Hemming
  • Mr Sandford
  • Richard Osborne
  • Mr Ramondon



Stage works to be identified:

  • The Livery Rare
  • The Lover's Opera
  • The Scotch Humour
  • The Honest Yorkshire-Man
  • The Double-Dealer
  • The Royal Chace
  • Apollo and Daphne
  • The Rape of Proserpine