Ayres and Dialogues for 1-3 Voices (Lawes, Henry)

Contents

Performances

Sheet Music

Scores

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Fynnjamin (2013/11/8)

PDF scanned by US-Bpr
Fynnjamin (2013/11/8)

PDF scanned by US-Bpr
Fynnjamin (2013/11/8)

PDF scanned by US-Bpr
Fynnjamin (2013/11/8)

Publisher. Info. London: T. H. for John Playford, 1653, 1655.
London: W. Godbid for John Playford, 1658.
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General Information

Work Title Ayres and Dialogues for 1-3 Voices
Alternative. Title Ayres and Dialogues, for One, Two, And Three Voyces
Composer Lawes, Henry
I-Catalogue NumberI-Cat. No. IHL 2
Movements/SectionsMov'ts/Sec's 3 books
First Publication. 1653
Librettist see below
Language English, 1 Italian, 1 Latin, 2 Ancient Greek
Dedication Book 1:
the two most excellent sisters, Alice Countess of Carbery, and Mary Lady Herbert of Cherbury and Castle-Island, daughters of John Earl of Bridgewater

Book 2: Lady Mary Dering, Wife to Sir Edward Dering of Surenden Dering
Book 3: Lord Colrane [Coleraine]

Composer Time PeriodComp. Period Baroque
Piece Style Baroque
Instrumentation 1-3 voices, continuo (theorbo/viol); 3 voices

Navigation etc.

About 10 years later Playford and Godbid brought out a very similar 3-volume collection, Select Musicall Ayres and Dialogues (Various), of which only Volume 3 is the same as here. Another similarly-titled collection is The Treasury of Musick (Lawes, Henry).

Contents

Book 1
For voice and continuo (author of text in brackets)
Ariadne (William Cartwright)
Am I dispis'd because you say (Robert Herrick)
Amarantha sweet and fair (Richard Lovelace)
Ask me why I send you here (Herrick)
Be gone, be gone, thou perjur'd man (Henry Lawes)
Careless of Love, and free from Fears (Carew Raleigh)
Chloris your self you so excell (Edmund Waller)
Celia thy bright Angel's face (Thomas, Earl of Winchelsea)
Canst thou love me, and yet doubt (William, Earl of Pembroke)
Come, my Lucasta (Charles Lucas)
Come, heavy souls (William Stroud)
Come, come thouh glorious object (Sir William Killigrew)
Come my sweet whilst every strain (William Cartwright)
Dearest do not nw delay me (Henry Harington, son of Sir Henry)
Farewell fair saint (Thomas Cary, late of the Bedchamber, son of the Earl of Monmouth)
Gaze not on Swann's (Henry Noel, son of Viscount Camden)
Give me more love or more disdain (Thomas Carew, late of the Privy Chamber)
He that love's a rosie cheek (Thomas Carew)
I long to sing the siege of Troy (John Berkenhead, after Anacreon)
If when the sun at noon (T. Carew)
It is not that I love you lesse (E. Waller)
Imbre lachrymarum largo (Thomas Fuller)
Ladies who gild the glitt'ring noon (Francis Lenton)
Lately on yonder swelling bush (E. Waller)
Lovely Chloris through thine eyes (Henry Reynolds)
The Day's return'd (J. Berkenhead)
Till now I never did believe (Sir Thomas Neville)
Till I beheld fair Celia's face (Francis Finch)
Tis true fair Celia (Henry Bathurst)
Thou art so fair and young (Aurelian Townshend)
Tis Wine that inspir's (Lord Broughall)
Two hundred minutes are run down (J. Berkenhead)
Venus redress a wrong (Cartwright)
When thou poor excommunicate (Carew)
When on the altar of my head (Carew)
While I listen to thy voice (Waller)
Θέλω λέγειν 'Ατζέιδας (Anacreon)
Inquel gelato core (various)
Dialogues and songs for 2 voices and continuo
Distressed Pilgrim (Francis Lovelace)
Aged man that mowes these fields (Aurelian Townshend)
As Celia rested in the shade (T. Carew)
Bacchus l'acchus fill our brains (A. Townshend)
Go thou emblem of my heart (H. Harington)
O the fickle state of lovers (Francis Quarles)
Musick thou Queen of Souls (Thomas Randolph)
Ayres and songs for 3 voices with or without continuo
Come Chloris, hie we to the bower (Henry Reynolds)
Though my torment far exceeds (H. Harington)
If my mistress fix her eye (H. Harington)
Keep on your vaile (W. Stroud)
Thou Shepheard whose intentive eye (A. Townshend)
O now the certain cause I know (Cartwright)
Sing fair Clorinda (William Davenant)
Grieve not dear love (John, Earl of Bristol)
Ladyes whose smooth and dainty skin (H. Harington)
Book 2
For voice and continuo
And is this all? what one poor kiss? (Edward Dering - music composed by Mary Dering)
Away, away, Anacreon (H. Harington)
Ah the false fatal tale I read (Reynolds)
But that I knew before we met (Finch)
Be not proud, 'cause fair and trim (John Grange)
Can so much beauty (Sir James Palmer)
Come my Lucasta since we see (Katherine Philips (1631-1664))
Cupid, who didst ne'er see light (Cartwright)
Chloris since first our calm of peace (Waller)
Come, Chloris, leave thy wandring sheep (H. Hughes)
Dear, thy face is heaven to me (Sir Christopher Neville)
Delicate Beauty (A. Townshend)
Elegie on Mrs. Sambrook (Mr. F. S[ambrook?])
Go little winged archer (Mr. I. C.)
Go lovely rose (Waller)
Help, help, O help (H. Hughes)
How long shall I a martyr be? (Hughes)
I have been in heaven I think (A. Townshend)
In vain fair Chloris you design (Edward Dering - music composed by Mary Dering)
Know Caelia since thou art so proud (Thomas Carew)
Ladies, you that seem so nice (H. Harington)
Let longing lovers sit and pine (Hughes)
Λέγουσιν άι γυναίκες / Legousin hai gunaikes (Anacreon)
Now, now, Lucasia (Berkenhead)
O how I hate thee now! (Berkenhead)
O King of Heaven and Hell (Berkenhead)
O turn away those cruel eyes (Thomas Stanley)
Old Poets Hippocrene admire (Mr. N. N.)
On this swelling bank (Mr. I. G.)
Such was the sorrow Chloris felt (H. Reynolds)
Take heed fair Chloris (Hughes)
Tell me no more 'tis love (Sir John Mennes)
Tis not i'th' power of all thy scorn (Matthew Clifford)
When first I saw fair Doris' eyes (Edward Dering - music composed by Mary Dering)
Was it a form, a gate, a grace (Reynolds)
When as Leander (Robert Herrick)
When we were parted (A. Townshend)
Yes, yes, 'tis Chloris sings (Reynolds)
Dialogues
Ah Coridon, contentedly we tend (Mr. S. B.)
Daphne, Shepherds if they knew (James Harrington)
Weep not (Thomas Carew)
Short Ayres
Among rose-buds slept a bee (Berkenhead)
A lover once I did espie (John Grange)
About the sweet-bag of a bee (Robert Herrick)
Beauties have yee seen a toy (Ben Jonson
Call the Spring with all her flowers (James Harrington)
Dear, let me now this evening (W. Davenant)
Fear not, dear love (Thomas Carew)
Hither we come into this world (John Fletcher)
In the non-age of a Winters day (Mr. I. M.)
View, Lesbia, view (Reynolds)
Why should great beauties (W. Davenant)
3 Hymns (John Crofts)
Book 3
Ayres - text to all by Henry Hughes
As sad Amintor in a meadow lay
Alas poor Cupif! thou art blind!
Beauty once blasted with the frost
Black as thy lovely eye or hair
Chloris when e're you do intend
Chloris now thou art fled away
Did I once say that thou wert fair
Fond woman thou mistak'st the marke
Fain would I love but that I fear
Forgive me love what I have done
Go young man let my heart alone
Go fair enchantress
Have you e're seen the morning sun
In love, away, you do me wrong
I prethee love take heed
Let me alone, I'll love no more
Love thee? Goodsooth not I
Mourn, mourn with me all true
Oft have I sworn I'd love no more
O now I find tis nought but fate
O tell me love, O tell me fate
See, see my Chloris (on the Queen's landing at Burlington)
See, Chloris, see how Nature brings
Stay ye greedy merchants, stay
Take heed bold lover, do not look
Though thou hast Wit and Beauty
What wilt thou pine or fall away?
When shall I see my captive heart?
Why up so early in the world?
Dialogues (author of text in brackets)
Among the Fancies, tell me this (Robert Herrick)
Awake fair Floramell (John Mennes)
Come Amaryllis I am ty'd by oath (Thomas Porter)
I love a Nymph (Reynolds)
Short Ayres
Dear, throw that flattering glasse away (Reynolds)
Do not delay though (H. Harington)
Go Phoebus clear thy face (H. Hughes)
I have prays'd with all my skill (H. Harington)
If you can find a heart sweet love (Sir Patrick Abercromy)
I prethee send me back my heart (H. Hughes)
Once Venus cheeks (W. Stroud)
Sure thou framed wert by art (John Grange)
Trust the forme of Ayre things (H. Harington)
When doth love set forth desire (Mr. N. D.)